theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”
Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”

Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

(via frontofbook)

Tags: Zadie Smith

3 of our lovely writers were include in TIME’s list of 21 Female Authors You Should Be Reading

3 of our lovely writers were include in TIME’s list of 21 Female Authors You Should Be Reading

housingworksbookstore:

theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”
Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

I will always reblog Zadie.

housingworksbookstore:

theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”

Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

I will always reblog Zadie.

(via peterwknox)

Tags: Zadie Smith

lastnightsreading:

Zadie Smith at the Schomburg Center, 3/19/14
Buy the drawing here.

lastnightsreading:

Zadie Smith at the Schomburg Center, 3/19/14

Buy the drawing here.

theparisreview:

Miss Adele had a right to her opinions. Thirty years in a city gives you the right. And now that she was, at long last, no longer beautiful, her opinions were all she had.”From our Spring issue, an excerpt from a new story by Zadie Smith.
Photography: Leland Bobbe.

theparisreview:

Miss Adele had a right to her opinions. Thirty years in a city gives you the right. And now that she was, at long last, no longer beautiful, her opinions were all she had.”

From our Spring issue, an excerpt from a new story by Zadie Smith.

Photography: Leland Bobbe.

Tags: Zadie Smith

Tags: Zadie Smith

 
"Happiness is not an absolute value. It is a state of comparison."

— Zadie Smith, NW

"

It was a difficult book to write. It was difficult fighting my own tendency towards smoothness. Smoothness can be a great advantage in a novel, a great asset to keep things bobbing along at a certain pace; but it can also be a way of being glib, of passing over what should be more closely examined. I wanted to create a different quality of attention in my reader.

Practically speaking, too, it was just a long process. Seven years is a long time and I had other obligations. It’s different writing with children and without, different writing at my age as compared to when I was 22. But despite the difficulties I found it to be by far the most rewarding writing experience of my life so far.

"

— Zadie Smith on writing NW.

(Source: nbcc.americanvanguardpress.com)

We’d like to wish Zadie Smith good luck at the National Book Critics Circle Awards tonight! We’ll keep our fingers crossed for NW. 
The NBCC blog interviewed Ms. Smith about her latest novel:
Ben Janse: Do you think authors owe it to their readers to be socially conscious in their novels and attempt to address the social issues of the day?
Zadie Smith: No. I don’t think authors owe their readers anything, or vice versa - it’s not that kind of relationship.  That said, I personally enjoy writing that attends to the present. I can see that the historical past comes with its own gravitas and weight, and that many writers rely on that as ballast. And to many readers, too, the present feels weightless, ‘trendy,’ un-literary.  I find I like that problem. I like taking on the challenge of a reader’s contempt for his own times.
BJ: What was the hardest thing to write in NW?
ZS: All of it. It was a difficult book to write. It was difficult fighting my own tendency towards smoothness. Smoothness can be a great advantage in a novel, a great asset to keep things bobbing along at a certain pace; but it can also be a way of being glib, of passing over what should be more closely examined. I wanted to create a different quality of attention in my reader.  
Practically speaking, too, it was just a long process. Seven years is a long time and I had other obligations. It’s different writing with children and without, different writing at my age as compared to when I was 22. But despite the difficulties I found it to be by far the most rewarding writing experience of my life so far.

We’d like to wish Zadie Smith good luck at the National Book Critics Circle Awards tonight! We’ll keep our fingers crossed for NW. 

The NBCC blog interviewed Ms. Smith about her latest novel:

Ben Janse: Do you think authors owe it to their readers to be socially conscious in their novels and attempt to address the social issues of the day?

Zadie Smith: No. I don’t think authors owe their readers anything, or vice versa - it’s not that kind of relationship.  That said, I personally enjoy writing that attends to the present. I can see that the historical past comes with its own gravitas and weight, and that many writers rely on that as ballast. And to many readers, too, the present feels weightless, ‘trendy,’ un-literary.  I find I like that problem. I like taking on the challenge of a reader’s contempt for his own times.

BJ: What was the hardest thing to write in NW?

ZS: All of it. It was a difficult book to write. It was difficult fighting my own tendency towards smoothness. Smoothness can be a great advantage in a novel, a great asset to keep things bobbing along at a certain pace; but it can also be a way of being glib, of passing over what should be more closely examined. I wanted to create a different quality of attention in my reader.  

Practically speaking, too, it was just a long process. Seven years is a long time and I had other obligations. It’s different writing with children and without, different writing at my age as compared to when I was 22. But despite the difficulties I found it to be by far the most rewarding writing experience of my life so far.