Here’s the lovely Savannah Guthrie enjoying her early copy of Double Down: Game Change 2012. Make sure to watch her exclusive interview with Mark Halperin and John Heilemann on 11/4 

Here’s the lovely Savannah Guthrie enjoying her early copy of Double Down: Game Change 2012. Make sure to watch her exclusive interview with Mark Halperin and John Heilemann on 11/4 

The Today Show profiles Nate Silver and his new book:

Human beings do not have very many natural defenses. We are not all that fast, and we are not all that strong. We do not have claws or fangs or body armor. We cannot spit venom. We cannot camouflage ourselves. And we cannot fly. Instead, we survive by means of our wits. Our minds are quick. We are wired to detect patterns and respond to opportunities and threats without much hesitation.

“This need of finding patterns, humans have this more than other animals,” I was told by Tomaso Poggio, an MIT neuroscientist who studies how our brains process information. “Recognizing objects in difficult situations means generalizing. A newborn baby can recognize the basic pattern of a face. It has been learned by evolution, not by the individual.”

The problem, Poggio says, is that these evolutionary instincts sometimes lead us to see patterns when there are none there. “People have been doing that all the time,” Poggio said. “Finding patterns in random noise.”

The human brain is quite remarkable; it can store perhaps three terabytes of information. And yet that is only about one one-millionth of the information that IBM says is now produced in the world each day. So we have to be terribly selective about the information we choose to remember.