The team behind Pantone: 35 Inspirational Color Palettes came up with a few for notable writers like David Foster Wallace, Ernest Hemingway, and Jane Austen. While such an experiment is on its face quite silly, the colors are eerily spot-on.

The New York Times dives into the new edition of Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms and its 47 alternate endings. Above: a draft of the novel’s first page. (Photo courtesy of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)

The New York Times dives into the new edition of Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms and its 47 alternate endings. Above: a draft of the novel’s first page. (Photo courtesy of John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)

A new edition of A Farewell to Arms will feature the 47 alternative endings Hemingway considered for the novel: 

Hemingway also compiled a list of alternate titles, including Love in War, World Enough and Time, Every Night and All, Of Wounds and Other Causes and The Enchantment, which Hemingway had crossed out. The final title, A Farewell To Arms, is taken from a 16th-century poem by English dramatist George Peele to Queen Elizabeth.
The endings, including one suggested by F Scott Fitzgerald, are in an appendix in the new 330-page edition, whose cover bears the novel’s original artwork, an illustration of topless lovers, by illustrator Rockwell Kent.
The ending that survived Hemingway’s revisions, about the death of Frederic Henry’s lover, the nurse Catherine Barkley, was:
"It was like saying good-by to a statue. After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain."
Among the 47 finales tried out by Hemingway was the so-called ‘Nada Ending’:
“That is all there is to the story. Catherine died and you will die and I will die and that is all I can promise you.”
and The ‘Live-Baby Ending’:
“There is no end except death and birth is the only beginning.”

A new edition of A Farewell to Arms will feature the 47 alternative endings Hemingway considered for the novel: 

Hemingway also compiled a list of alternate titles, including Love in War, World Enough and Time, Every Night and All, Of Wounds and Other Causes and The Enchantment, which Hemingway had crossed out. The final title, A Farewell To Arms, is taken from a 16th-century poem by English dramatist George Peele to Queen Elizabeth.

The endings, including one suggested by F Scott Fitzgerald, are in an appendix in the new 330-page edition, whose cover bears the novel’s original artwork, an illustration of topless lovers, by illustrator Rockwell Kent.

The ending that survived Hemingway’s revisions, about the death of Frederic Henry’s lover, the nurse Catherine Barkley, was:

"It was like saying good-by to a statue. After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain."

Among the 47 finales tried out by Hemingway was the so-called ‘Nada Ending’:

“That is all there is to the story. Catherine died and you will die and I will die and that is all I can promise you.”

and The ‘Live-Baby Ending’:

“There is no end except death and birth is the only beginning.”

Every year or so the internet debates whether it’s better to write standing up. Hemingway’s a big booster of the practice, as Kottke notes, and this week The Wirecutter collects the latest health benefits of the practice:

The standing desk fad that you keep hearing about is based on a pretty substantial amount of research. Dr. James Levine of the Mayo Clinic has a scary statistic to share: here in the US, we spend more than half of our waking hour sitting down, split between watching TV, driving a car, and working at a desk. This is not good.
The problem with sitting is essentially two-fold. AJ Jacobs, editor-at-large at Esquire, and author of the book Drop Dead Healthy breaks it down this way in his newest book: “The first part is obvious: We burn fewer calories when we’re sitting. The second part is more subtle but perhaps more profound: marathon sitting sessions change our body’s metabolism.”


Bill Phillips at Men’s Health writes about a study in the research journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise that found, in a large research pool of 17,000 men and women, that people who “sit for most of the day are 54 percent more likely to die of heart attacks.” Sure, correlation is not necessarily cause for alarm, but get this piece from a Men’s Health feature on sitting: “We see it in people who smoke and people who don’t,” Katzmarzyk told Masters. “We see it in people who are regular exercisers and those who aren’t. Sitting is an independent risk factor.”” Professor Marc Hamilton, Ph.D from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, says to Maria Masters in the same Men’s Health feature, Is Your Office Chair Killing You?, ”The cure for too much sitting isn’t more exercise. Exercise is good, of course, but the average person could never do enough to counteract the effect of hours and hours of chair time.”

What do you think?

Every year or so the internet debates whether it’s better to write standing up. Hemingway’s a big booster of the practice, as Kottke notes, and this week The Wirecutter collects the latest health benefits of the practice:

The standing desk fad that you keep hearing about is based on a pretty substantial amount of research. Dr. James Levine of the Mayo Clinic has a scary statistic to share: here in the US, we spend more than half of our waking hour sitting down, split between watching TV, driving a car, and working at a desk. This is not good.

The problem with sitting is essentially two-fold. AJ Jacobs, editor-at-large at Esquire, and author of the book Drop Dead Healthy breaks it down this way in his newest book: “The first part is obvious: We burn fewer calories when we’re sitting. The second part is more subtle but perhaps more profound: marathon sitting sessions change our body’s metabolism.”

Bill Phillips at Men’s Health writes about a study in the research journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise that found, in a large research pool of 17,000 men and women, that people who “sit for most of the day are 54 percent more likely to die of heart attacks.” Sure, correlation is not necessarily cause for alarm, but get this piece from a Men’s Health feature on sitting: “We see it in people who smoke and people who don’t,” Katzmarzyk told Masters. “We see it in people who are regular exercisers and those who aren’t. Sitting is an independent risk factor.”” Professor Marc Hamilton, Ph.D from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, says to Maria Masters in the same Men’s Health feature, Is Your Office Chair Killing You?, ”The cure for too much sitting isn’t more exercise. Exercise is good, of course, but the average person could never do enough to counteract the effect of hours and hours of chair time.”

What do you think?

The Toronto Star is publishing “The Hemingway Papers,” a collection of the columns the young Nobel laureate wrote for the paper in the 1920s. Including this one on bullfighting:

Without an instant’s hesitation, the bull charged Chicuelo. The kid stood his ground, simply swung back on his heels and floated his cape like a ballet dancer’s skirt into the bull’s face as he passed.
“Olé!”—pronounced Oh-Lay!—roared the crowd.
The bull whirled and charged again. Without moving, Chicuelo repeated the performance. His legs rigid, just withdrawing his body from the rush of the bull’s horns and floating the cape out with that beautiful swing.
Again the crowd roared. The Kid did this seven times. Each time the bull missed him by inches. Each time he gave the bull a free shot at him. Each time the crowd roared. Then he flopped the cape once at the bull at the finish of a pass, swung it around behind him and walked away from the bull to the barrera.
“He’s the boy with the cape all right,” said the Gin Bottle King. “That swing he did with the cape’s called a veronica.”
The chubby-faced Kid who did not like bullfighting and had just done the seven wonderful veronicas was standing against the fence just below us. His face glistened with sweat in the sun but was almost expressionless. His eyes were looking out across the arena where the bull was standing making up his mind to charge a picador. He was studying the bull because a few minutes later it would be his duty to kill him, and once he went out with his thin, red-hilted sword and his piece of red cloth to kill the bull in the final set it would be him or the bull. There are no drawn battles in bullfighting.

The Toronto Star is publishing “The Hemingway Papers,” a collection of the columns the young Nobel laureate wrote for the paper in the 1920s. Including this one on bullfighting:

Without an instant’s hesitation, the bull charged Chicuelo. The kid stood his ground, simply swung back on his heels and floated his cape like a ballet dancer’s skirt into the bull’s face as he passed.

“Olé!”—pronounced Oh-Lay!—roared the crowd.

The bull whirled and charged again. Without moving, Chicuelo repeated the performance. His legs rigid, just withdrawing his body from the rush of the bull’s horns and floating the cape out with that beautiful swing.

Again the crowd roared. The Kid did this seven times. Each time the bull missed him by inches. Each time he gave the bull a free shot at him. Each time the crowd roared. Then he flopped the cape once at the bull at the finish of a pass, swung it around behind him and walked away from the bull to the barrera.

“He’s the boy with the cape all right,” said the Gin Bottle King. “That swing he did with the cape’s called a veronica.”

The chubby-faced Kid who did not like bullfighting and had just done the seven wonderful veronicas was standing against the fence just below us. His face glistened with sweat in the sun but was almost expressionless. His eyes were looking out across the arena where the bull was standing making up his mind to charge a picador. He was studying the bull because a few minutes later it would be his duty to kill him, and once he went out with his thin, red-hilted sword and his piece of red cloth to kill the bull in the final set it would be him or the bull. There are no drawn battles in bullfighting.