bookcountryofficial:

We are launching our Ask an Editor blog series in August!
Editors are involved in almost every step of the publishing process. Submit questions you would like to ask an editor here on Tumblr or in the discussion boards. 

bookcountryofficial:

We are launching our Ask an Editor blog series in August!

Editors are involved in almost every step of the publishing process. Submit questions you would like to ask an editor here on Tumblr or in the discussion boards. 

via HuffPost
8 Great New Books By Women You Should Definitely Read
2014 has been deemed the “Year of Reading Women.”  Let’s support this movement!
The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai
Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng
Black Vodka: Ten Stories by Deborah Levy
I’ll Be Right There by Kyung-sook Shin
The Vacationers by Emma Straub
Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi
Off Course by Michelle Huneven
Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique
 

via HuffPost

8 Great New Books By Women You Should Definitely Read

2014 has been deemed the “Year of Reading Women.”  Let’s support this movement!

The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Black Vodka: Ten Stories by Deborah Levy

I’ll Be Right There by Kyung-sook Shin

The Vacationers by Emma Straub

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

Off Course by Michelle Huneven

Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique

 

Via Flavorwire
The 35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet
Zadie Smith
No Twitter, no personal blog, and close to 35k fans following the Facebook page that her publisher runs for her; Zadie Smith really has zero personal Internet presence, save for maybe her sporadic posts on the New York Review of Books website. Yet while Smith might not have a clever Twitter handle, she’s all over social media proxy, with her many fans sharing quotes, articles, and her live talks (with fellow Internet-shy authors Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie or Karl Ove Knausgård) all the time. She’s one of the few big-name writers who has managed to develop a huge Internet presence without even seeming to spend much time online.
Neil Gaiman
It isn’t simply the over two million Twitter followers that make Gaimain an online powerhouse — it’s that he seems to genuinely enjoy interacting with his fans. The fact is, he had a massive following long before anyone knew what “social media” was, and doesn’t really need to tweet or use his Tumblr with such frequency to promote his work. That he spends so much time online, regardless, is what makes his noticeable presence very welcome.
John Green
Have you ever gone to Tumblr and looked at how many posts are tagged “John Green“? It’s a rabbit hole worth falling down at least once. Then there’s the 2.85 million people who follow him on Twitter — making Green easily one of the most popular writers on the Internet, and one who’s always interacting with fans.
Rachel Fershleiser 
A book evangelist, Fershleiser spends her days doing literary and nonprofit outreach at Tumblr, and takes any chance she can to talk about the “Bookternet.” She tweets all the time, has given a TEDx talk on the literary Internet, and, of course, she’s very active on Tumblr.
See the rest of the list here!

Via Flavorwire

The 35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet

Zadie Smith

No Twitter, no personal blog, and close to 35k fans following the Facebook page that her publisher runs for her; Zadie Smith really has zero personal Internet presence, save for maybe her sporadic posts on the New York Review of Books website. Yet while Smith might not have a clever Twitter handle, she’s all over social media proxy, with her many fans sharing quotes, articles, and her live talks (with fellow Internet-shy authors Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie or Karl Ove Knausgård) all the time. She’s one of the few big-name writers who has managed to develop a huge Internet presence without even seeming to spend much time online.

Neil Gaiman

It isn’t simply the over two million Twitter followers that make Gaimain an online powerhouse — it’s that he seems to genuinely enjoy interacting with his fans. The fact is, he had a massive following long before anyone knew what “social media” was, and doesn’t really need to tweet or use his Tumblr with such frequency to promote his work. That he spends so much time online, regardless, is what makes his noticeable presence very welcome.

John Green

Have you ever gone to Tumblr and looked at how many posts are tagged “John Green“? It’s a rabbit hole worth falling down at least once. Then there’s the 2.85 million people who follow him on Twitter — making Green easily one of the most popular writers on the Internet, and one who’s always interacting with fans.

Rachel Fershleiser 

A book evangelist, Fershleiser spends her days doing literary and nonprofit outreach at Tumblr, and takes any chance she can to talk about the “Bookternet.” She tweets all the time, has given a TEDx talk on the literary Internet, and, of course, she’s very active on Tumblr.

See the rest of the list here!

via New York Times
Don’t Teach Math, Coach It
I’ve learned a lot about what kind of math parent I want to be from an unexpected source —coaches.
Baseball is a game. And math, for kids, is a game, too. Everything for them is a game. That’s the great thing about being a kid. In Little League, you play hard and you play to win, but it doesn’t actually matter who wins. And good coaches get this. They don’t get mad and they don’t throw you off the team. They don’t tell you that you stink at baseball, even if you do — they tell you what you need to do to get better, which everybody can do.
What does it mean to coach math instead of teaching it? For C. J., it means I give him a “mystery number” to think about before bed. “I’m thinking of a mystery number, and when I multiply it by 2 and add 7, I get 29; what’s the mystery number?” And already you’re doing not just arithmetic but algebra.
For his little sister, who’s 4, that’s too formal. But say we’re at the grocery store and we need four cans of soup and she brings me two, and I say, “So we need three more, right?” and she says, “No, Daddy!” That’s really funny when you’re 4. It’s a game, and it’s math.
Read the rest here

 

via New York Times

Don’t Teach Math, Coach It

I’ve learned a lot about what kind of math parent I want to be from an unexpected source —coaches.

Baseball is a game. And math, for kids, is a game, too. Everything for them is a game. That’s the great thing about being a kid. In Little League, you play hard and you play to win, but it doesn’t actually matter who wins. And good coaches get this. They don’t get mad and they don’t throw you off the team. They don’t tell you that you stink at baseball, even if you do — they tell you what you need to do to get better, which everybody can do.

What does it mean to coach math instead of teaching it? For C. J., it means I give him a “mystery number” to think about before bed. “I’m thinking of a mystery number, and when I multiply it by 2 and add 7, I get 29; what’s the mystery number?” And already you’re doing not just arithmetic but algebra.

For his little sister, who’s 4, that’s too formal. But say we’re at the grocery store and we need four cans of soup and she brings me two, and I say, “So we need three more, right?” and she says, “No, Daddy!” That’s really funny when you’re 4. It’s a game, and it’s math.

Read the rest here

 

EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU is taking Booktube by a storm! 

"I gotta say, I loved this book. I devoured it in a day and a half!" —Bookables  

Thanks for the review, Heather!

bookriot:

Which of these books about smart people should you buy, borrow, or bypass? Bonus: which is best on audio? We’ve got the verdict.

LEXICON gets a buy vote!

Today we’re celebrating the release of Blue-Eyed Boy and all our Marines overseas!

Today we’re celebrating the release of Blue-Eyed Boy and all our Marines overseas!

Wish we were there!
postcardstoauthors:

Zadie Smith is the author of 5 books, including White Teeth, On Beauty, Changing My Mind, & NW.

postcardstoauthors:

Zadie Smith is the author of 5 books, including White Teeth, On Beauty, Changing My Mind, & NW.

How far do we get into books before giving up? 

"We’ve all done it - bought a book with great intentions of tearing through it. But then reality sets in. We find ourselves less and less motivated to make it to the end. Author and mathematician Jordan Ellenberg wanted to quantify this phenomenon and has come up with a way to measure when exactly a reader gives up."