Let our ad in today’s New York Times be your Father’s Day gift guide!  The men in your life will be sure to love one (or all) of these titles:

image

Penguin Random House: 250 imprints, 1 great new look… Check out our new logo

image

Celeste Ng had some great tips for first-time authors at BEA ‘14, in this article by Bustle:

“When an idea keeps haunting you, a story keeps coming back to you, and things keep sticking to it, then that’s how you know you have enough to say. And you need to write it.” — Celeste Ng, author of Everything I Never Told Youout June 14”

rachelfershleiser:

Monday in the park with Celeste Ng.

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng in the wild!

rachelfershleiser:

Monday in the park with Celeste Ng.

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng in the wild!

"War subjects some of its participants to more than any person can bear, and it destroys them. War makes others stronger. For most of us, it leaves a complex legacy. And though many veterans appreciate the well-meaning sentiments behind even the most misdirected pity, I can’t help feeling that all of us, especially those who are struggling, deserve a little less pity and a little more respect." —Phil Klay, author of Redeployment
(via The Wall Street Journal)

"War subjects some of its participants to more than any person can bear, and it destroys them. War makes others stronger. For most of us, it leaves a complex legacy. And though many veterans appreciate the well-meaning sentiments behind even the most misdirected pity, I can’t help feeling that all of us, especially those who are struggling, deserve a little less pity and a little more respect." —Phil Klay, author of Redeployment

(via The Wall Street Journal)

Celebrating great first sentences and great first books—including Celeste Ng and Everything I Never Told You— at the One Story Debutante Ball, yesterday in Brooklyn.

Summer Reading Suggestions viaThe Boston Globe
If you liked “Mystic River” by Dennis Lehane
■ “Everything I Never Told You” by Celeste Ng (June 26) A Chinese-American family living in a small Ohio town is devastated when the favored middle daughter drowns. 
If you liked “Gone Girl” By Gillian Flynn
■ “Casebook” by Mona Simpson(April 15) A teenage boy must reckon with evil when he goes to maniacal lengths to spy on his separating parents.

Summer Reading Suggestions viaThe Boston Globe

If you liked “Mystic River” by Dennis Lehane

 Everything I Never Told You” by Celeste Ng (June 26) A Chinese-American family living in a small Ohio town is devastated when the favored middle daughter drowns. 

If you liked “Gone Girl” By Gillian Flynn

 “Casebook” by Mona Simpson(April 15) A teenage boy must reckon with evil when he goes to maniacal lengths to spy on his separating parents.

What Farm-to-Table Got Wrong

By DAN BARBER

POCANTICO HILLS, N.Y. — IT’S spring again. Hip deep in asparagus — and, soon enough, tomatoes and zucchini — farm-to-table advocates finally have something from the farm to put on the table.

The crowds clamoring for just-dug produce at the farmers’ market and the local food co-op suggest that this movement is no longer just a foodie fad. Today, almost 80 percent of Americans say sustainability is a priority when purchasing food. The promise of this kind of majority is that eating local can reshape landscapes and drive lasting change.

Except it hasn’t. More than a decade into the movement, the promise has fallen short. For all its successes, farm-to-table has not, in any fundamental way, reworked the economic and political forces that dictate how our food is grown and raised. Big Food is getting bigger, not smaller. In the last five years, we’ve lost nearly 100,000 farms (mostly midsize ones). Today, 1.1 percent of farms in the United States account for nearly 45 percent of farm revenues. Despite being farm-to-table’s favorite targets, corn and soy account for more than 50 percent of our harvested acres for the first time ever. Between 2006 and 2011, over a million acres of native prairie were plowed up in the so-called Western Corn Belt to make way for these two crops, the most rapid loss of grasslands since we started using tractors to bust sod on the Great Plains in the 1920s.

Dan Barber is the author of The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food. Read the rest of the New York Times op-ed here.

Photos by Arline Griffith-Nash

wnyc:

Brian Lehrer Weekend: Elizabeth Drew remembers reporting on Nixon during the Watergate era; Anand Giridharadas tells a story of violence and forgiveness in “True American”; and Michael Pollan finally learns how to cook. Listen here.

-Jody, BL Show-

We love it when our authors are also chefs! Thank you Blue Hill and Dan Barber for these adorable (and delicious) afternoon treats! Looking forward to celebrating The Third Plate’s release next week

We love it when our authors are also chefs! Thank you Blue Hill and Dan Barber for these adorable (and delicious) afternoon treats! Looking forward to celebrating The Third Plate’s release next week