From Gristlist:

Ski stunts in Detroit’s abandoned spaces will take your breath away. Watch the amazing video here

"They were careless people, Tom and Daisy—they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made."- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

"They were careless people, Tom and Daisy—they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made."
- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

from Buzzfeed: 

Q: Which of these books is more ‘difficult’ according to Common Core (a teaching initiative adopted by 45 states)?

A: The illustrated book about the “Twilight” movies is 1240L while “Lot 49” is 1060L. Oh, and “Twilight” itself is 720L, which is more ‘difficult’ than any Hemingway.

This made us laugh!

Enter the giveaway here: 

Enter the giveaway here

randomhouse:

Click through for the full-size JPEG here or view the clickable PDF here!
Books make perfect holiday gifts. They always fit, they’re easy to wrap, and they’re more fun to open than a gift card. (They also last much longer than a fruit basket.) Plus we make it really, really easy for you to find the right one. 
If you don’t see the right gift above, browse through our gift guides by category. And if you’re still looking, please direct your attention over to Personal Penguin, where you can tell us a little about your intended recipient and get a personalized list of perfect presents. 
Easy as pie books. (Pie’s not actually anywhere near this easy.)

randomhouse:

Click through for the full-size JPEG here or view the clickable PDF here!

Books make perfect holiday gifts. They always fit, they’re easy to wrap, and they’re more fun to open than a gift card. (They also last much longer than a fruit basket.) Plus we make it really, really easy for you to find the right one. 

If you don’t see the right gift above, browse through our gift guides by category. And if you’re still looking, please direct your attention over to Personal Penguin, where you can tell us a little about your intended recipient and get a personalized list of perfect presents. 

Easy as pie books. (Pie’s not actually anywhere near this easy.)

What goes well with dirty politics? A martini of course!

Ice cubes
2 ounces vodka or gin
4 to 5 teaspoons olive brine
Splash of dry vermouth
Garnish: green olives


 

What goes well with dirty politics? A martini of course!

Ice cubes

2 ounces vodka or gin

4 to 5 teaspoons olive brine

Splash of dry vermouth

Garnish: green olives

 

“Maybe you have to believe in the value of everything to believe in the value of anything.”
WILD ONES by journalist Jon Mooallem isn’t the typical story designed to make us better by making us feel bad, to scare us into behaving, into environmental empathy; Mooallem’s is not the self-righteous tone of capital-K knowing typical of many environmental activists but the scientist’s disposition of not-knowing, the poet’s penchant for “negative capability.” Rather than ready-bake answers, he offers instead directions of thought and signposts for curiosity and, in the process, somehow gently moves us a little bit closer to our better selves, to a deep sense of, as poet Diane Ackerman beautifully put it in 1974, “the plain everythingness of everything, in cahoots with the everythingness of everything else.”
-Maria Popova, Brain Pickings
Read more at http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/12/10/best-science-technology-books-2013/

“Maybe you have to believe in the value of everything to believe in the value of anything.”

WILD ONES by journalist Jon Mooallem isn’t the typical story designed to make us better by making us feel bad, to scare us into behaving, into environmental empathy; Mooallem’s is not the self-righteous tone of capital-K knowing typical of many environmental activists but the scientist’s disposition of not-knowing, the poet’s penchant for “negative capability.” Rather than ready-bake answers, he offers instead directions of thought and signposts for curiosity and, in the process, somehow gently moves us a little bit closer to our better selves, to a deep sense of, as poet Diane Ackerman beautifully put it in 1974, “the plain everythingness of everything, in cahoots with the everythingness of everything else.”

-Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

Read more at http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/12/10/best-science-technology-books-2013/

from Frank Bruni’s op-ed on Ties that Bind 
 

from Frank Bruni’s op-ed on Ties that Bind 

 

Congratulations to Jon! 

Congratulations to Jon! 

"He smiled, and I knew I would never see him again.
John Carlin recalls his last, poignant encounter with Nelson Mandela, who had come to play a central part in his life."

The Independent http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/nelson-mandela-dies-he-smiled-and-i-knew-i-would-never-see-him-again-8987639.html