Best of luck to the Wildcats this weekend!

Best of luck to the Wildcats this weekend!

via Esquire UK
10 Step Guide To Surviving The Apocalypse by Lewis Dartnell
Any idea how you would handle yourself if the world as we know it was smited into oblivion? Research scientist Dr Lewis Dartnell, author of the upcoming book The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch, tells us how to make a crack of surviving the aftermath. 
1 | Don’t Panic
It’s the morning after the end of the world as we know it. Most of humanity has been obliterated. But, hey – things aren’t all bad.
There are plenty of resources left behind that you can scavenge to keep yourself going comfortably: mountains of canned food in the deserted supermarkets, underground lakes of fuel in petrol stations, countless abandoned cars and homes.
Night in the Playboy Mansion, anyone? 
2 | Forget Fashion
Sure, you can take this opportunity to raid the entire contents of Selfridge’s and be the best-dressed survivor on the planet.
But it’s time for pragmatism – you need clothes that wil help you in the weird new world you find yourself in. 
Hard-wearing trousers, layers of warm tops and a good waterproof jacket will keep you comfortable when spending a lot more time outdoors or in unheated buildings.
And remember, the hospitals are in pieces so a broken leg isn’t really an option. Decent hiking boots are suddenly essential. 
 
3 | Be A Firestarter 
Like your primitive ancestors, fire is going to become your life-saver.
It’ll keep the cold away and mean you can rustle up dinner.
At first, there’ll be plenty of lighters and boxes of matches lying around, but it won’t stay that easy for long.
You’ll need to learn to strike steel and flint, focusing sunlight with a lens or polished bottom of a drinks can, or even brushing the terminals of a 9V battery against some wire wool.
Unleash your inner caveman. You know you want to.
4 | Keep Your Friends Close
Civilisation has collapsed. Your days of mate-making over a pint are over.
Gangs and bandits will be roaming the land, and the best way to keep safe is to surround yourself with a group you can trust.
Working in a team, you’ll also be able to scavenge and find other survivors far more effectively. 

 Read the rest of the article here

via Esquire UK

10 Step Guide To Surviving The Apocalypse by Lewis Dartnell

Any idea how you would handle yourself if the world as we know it was smited into oblivion? Research scientist Dr Lewis Dartnell, author of the upcoming book The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch, tells us how to make a crack of surviving the aftermath.

1 | Don’t Panic

It’s the morning after the end of the world as we know it. Most of humanity has been obliterated. But, hey – things aren’t all bad.

There are plenty of resources left behind that you can scavenge to keep yourself going comfortably: mountains of canned food in the deserted supermarkets, underground lakes of fuel in petrol stations, countless abandoned cars and homes.

Night in the Playboy Mansion, anyone? 

2 | Forget Fashion

Sure, you can take this opportunity to raid the entire contents of Selfridge’s and be the best-dressed survivor on the planet.

But it’s time for pragmatism – you need clothes that wil help you in the weird new world you find yourself in. 

Hard-wearing trousers, layers of warm tops and a good waterproof jacket will keep you comfortable when spending a lot more time outdoors or in unheated buildings.

And remember, the hospitals are in pieces so a broken leg isn’t really an option. Decent hiking boots are suddenly essential. 

 

3 | Be A Firestarter 

Like your primitive ancestors, fire is going to become your life-saver.

It’ll keep the cold away and mean you can rustle up dinner.

At first, there’ll be plenty of lighters and boxes of matches lying around, but it won’t stay that easy for long.

You’ll need to learn to strike steel and flint, focusing sunlight with a lens or polished bottom of a drinks can, or even brushing the terminals of a 9V battery against some wire wool.

Unleash your inner caveman. You know you want to.

4 | Keep Your Friends Close

Civilisation has collapsed. Your days of mate-making over a pint are over.

Gangs and bandits will be roaming the land, and the best way to keep safe is to surround yourself with a group you can trust.

Working in a team, you’ll also be able to scavenge and find other survivors far more effectively. 

 Read the rest of the article here

Enter to win a copy of The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills, this is a heartwarming read!
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of the best loved novels of the twentieth century. But for the last fifty years, the novel’s celebrated author, Harper Lee, has said almost nothing on the record. Journalists have trekked to her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where Harper Lee, known to her friends as Nelle, has lived with her sister, Alice, for decades, trying and failing to get an interview with the author. But in 2001, the Lee sisters opened their door to Chicago Tribune journalist Marja Mills. It was the beginning of a long conversation—and a great friendship. In 2004, with the Lees’ blessing, Mills moved into the house next door to the sisters. She spent the next eighteen months there, sharing coffee at McDonalds and trips to the Laundromat with Nelle, feeding the ducks and going out for catfish supper with the sisters, and exploring all over lower Alabama with the Lees’ inner circle of friends. Nelle shared her love of history, literature, and the Southern way of life with Mills, as well as her keen sense of how journalism should be practiced. As the sisters decided to let Mills tell their story, Nelle helped make sure she was getting the story—and the South—right. Alice, the keeper of the Lee family history, shared the stories of their family. The Mockingbird Next Door is the story of Mills’s friendship with the Lee sisters. It is a testament to the great intelligence, sharp wit, and tremendous storytelling power of these two women, especially that of Nelle.
Mills was given a rare opportunity to know Nelle Harper Lee, to be part of the Lees’ life in Alabama, and to hear them reflect on their upbringing, their corner of the Deep South, how To Kill a Mockingbird affected their lives, and why Nelle Harper Lee chose to never write another novel.  
Enter to win here

Enter to win a copy of The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee by Marja Mills, this is a heartwarming read!

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of the best loved novels of the twentieth century. But for the last fifty years, the novel’s celebrated author, Harper Lee, has said almost nothing on the record. Journalists have trekked to her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where Harper Lee, known to her friends as Nelle, has lived with her sister, Alice, for decades, trying and failing to get an interview with the author. But in 2001, the Lee sisters opened their door to Chicago Tribune journalist Marja Mills. It was the beginning of a long conversation—and a great friendship.
 
In 2004, with the Lees’ blessing, Mills moved into the house next door to the sisters. She spent the next eighteen months there, sharing coffee at McDonalds and trips to the Laundromat with Nelle, feeding the ducks and going out for catfish supper with the sisters, and exploring all over lower Alabama with the Lees’ inner circle of friends.
 
Nelle shared her love of history, literature, and the Southern way of life with Mills, as well as her keen sense of how journalism should be practiced. As the sisters decided to let Mills tell their story, Nelle helped make sure she was getting the story—and the South—right. Alice, the keeper of the Lee family history, shared the stories of their family.
 
The Mockingbird Next Door is the story of Mills’s friendship with the Lee sisters. It is a testament to the great intelligence, sharp wit, and tremendous storytelling power of these two women, especially that of Nelle.

Mills was given a rare opportunity to know Nelle Harper Lee, to be part of the Lees’ life in Alabama, and to hear them reflect on their upbringing, their corner of the Deep South, how To Kill a Mockingbird affected their lives, and why Nelle Harper Lee chose to never write another novel.  

Enter to win here

The New Yorker Books to Watch Out For: April
“The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch” (Penguin), by Lewis Dartnell, out April 17th. This book poses a thought experiment: Civilization as we know it has fallen apart, perhaps because of a plague, war, or natural disaster. Social institutions and technological infrastructure have crumbled. Would it be possible to reboot modern life by following a few basic principles of survival and technological development? Darnell, a researcher in astrobiology at the U.K. Space Agency, attempts to create a post-apocalyptic “quick-start guide” that tests whether “the key to preserving civilization is to provide a condensed seed that will readily unpack to yield the entire expansive tree of knowledge, rather than attempting to document the colossal tree itself.”—A.D.
Read the rest of the article here
Image: Courtesy of The New Yorker

The New Yorker Books to Watch Out For: April

“The Knowledge: How to Rebuild Our World from Scratch” (Penguin), by Lewis Dartnell, out April 17th. This book poses a thought experiment: Civilization as we know it has fallen apart, perhaps because of a plague, war, or natural disaster. Social institutions and technological infrastructure have crumbled. Would it be possible to reboot modern life by following a few basic principles of survival and technological development? Darnell, a researcher in astrobiology at the U.K. Space Agency, attempts to create a post-apocalyptic “quick-start guide” that tests whether “the key to preserving civilization is to provide a condensed seed that will readily unpack to yield the entire expansive tree of knowledge, rather than attempting to document the colossal tree itself.”—A.D.

Read the rest of the article here

Image: Courtesy of The New Yorker

 from Omnivoracious, Amazon’s book blog
“Success was a matter of perspective. In Iraq it had to be.” This opening line, from one of the stories in Phil Klay’s impressive debut collection, Redeployment, encapsulates what the book does best: through the many viewpoints represented by his twelve stories, Klay gives us not just a gripping portrait of the Iraq War but a glimpse into the true human cost of war, abroad and at home.
 

 from Omnivoracious, Amazon’s book blog

“Success was a matter of perspective. In Iraq it had to be.” This opening line, from one of the stories in Phil Klay’s impressive debut collection, Redeployment, encapsulates what the book does best: through the many viewpoints represented by his twelve stories, Klay gives us not just a gripping portrait of the Iraq War but a glimpse into the true human cost of war, abroad and at home.

 

 Food obsessives: the people searching for the perfect cheese, bread and coffee by Simon Wroe
They spend every waking hour attempting to make the perfect espresso, sourdough or cheddar. Why? Because they have to …
Andy Mahoney realized his habit was getting out of hand a few months ago, during a visit to an old coastal fort on the Hampshire coast. “I saw white mold on the wall, so I put some in my mouth to see if it was any of the molds I was expecting,” he says. “It struck me that maybe I’d gone a bit crazy.” Mahoney’s brain had turned, as it often does, to cheese. He has attempted to make every imaginable type of cheese, with all kinds of mold. In the course of his experiments, he has even invented a few franken-cheddars of his own. (He’s also poisoned himself a couple of times, but that hasn’t stopped him yet.)
Mahoney belongs to a rare sub-species of gastronome: the obsessive. These individuals seek to master one particular foodstuff; they are in pursuit of an elusive Platonic form and will go to extreme lengths to get it. Seldom are they professional chefs – the catering industry lacks the time and nerve for such tunnel vision. In some cases the obsession has led to a relevant job or startup; in others it bunks awkwardly with a pre-existing life. (Mahoney, when he is not cutting curds or nibbling molds, works as a city trader.) Either way, it’s never done for the money. It’s done because it has to be done.

Read the rest of The Guardian article here
Chop Chop by Simon Wroe will be released on April 17th

 Food obsessives: the people searching for the perfect cheese, bread and coffee by Simon Wroe

They spend every waking hour attempting to make the perfect espresso, sourdough or cheddar. Why? Because they have to …

Andy Mahoney realized his habit was getting out of hand a few months ago, during a visit to an old coastal fort on the Hampshire coast. “I saw white mold on the wall, so I put some in my mouth to see if it was any of the molds I was expecting,” he says. “It struck me that maybe I’d gone a bit crazy.” Mahoney’s brain had turned, as it often does, to cheese. He has attempted to make every imaginable type of cheese, with all kinds of mold. In the course of his experiments, he has even invented a few franken-cheddars of his own. (He’s also poisoned himself a couple of times, but that hasn’t stopped him yet.)

Mahoney belongs to a rare sub-species of gastronome: the obsessive. These individuals seek to master one particular foodstuff; they are in pursuit of an elusive Platonic form and will go to extreme lengths to get it. Seldom are they professional chefs – the catering industry lacks the time and nerve for such tunnel vision. In some cases the obsession has led to a relevant job or startup; in others it bunks awkwardly with a pre-existing life. (Mahoney, when he is not cutting curds or nibbling molds, works as a city trader.) Either way, it’s never done for the money. It’s done because it has to be done.

Read the rest of The Guardian article here

Chop Chop by Simon Wroe will be released on April 17th

 Ridiculously Overdue Library Books (That Were Finally Returned) via Mental Floss

1.  DAYS AND DEEDS BY BURTON AND ELIZABETH STEVENSON

YEARS OVERDUE: 47

According to Guinness World Records, the $345.14 fee paid by the borrower of this lyrical compilation stands as the highest library fine ever paid.

Image: Courtesy of Amazon

 

2. THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY BY OSCAR WILDE

YEARS OVERDUE: 78

Mrs. Harlean Hoffman Vision found a rare edition of this novel nestled amongst her late mother’s personal effects and vowed to set things right. “She kept saying, ‘You’re not going to arrest me?’” recalls marketing director Ruth Lednicer, “and we said, ‘No, we’re so happy you brought it back.’”

 

3. MASTER OF MEN BY E. PHILLIPS OPPENHEIM
YEARS OVERDUE: 79

Oppenheim was born in the surrounding region and, hence, the Leicestershire County Council was thrilled to reclaim this piece of their literary heritage after it turned up in a nearby house—even though the library branch it originally belonged to had shut down decades earlier.

Read the rest of the post here

San Francisco in Mark Twain’s Time via The San Francisco Chronicle 

Market Street, as seen from Montgomery Street. “The city had been a refuge in the 1860s,” Tarnoff writes, but by the mid-1870s, “it looked more like a dumping ground. People from other parts of the country washed up on its shores looking for work, swelling the ranks of the poor. By 1877, San Francisco’s unemployment rate was as high as 25 percent. … ‘Bankruptcy, suicide, and murder and robberies were the order of the day,’ recalled one workingman. The city’s literary fortunes had undergone an equally steep decline. The last remnants of the Bohemian scene had vanished.”

For more information on The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature by Ben Tarnoff, please click here

Photo: Courtesy of the Society of California Pioneers

from Careless People: Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of The Great Gatsby by Sarah Churchwell-
Contrary to popular belief, speakeasies relied on business cards instead of passwords to keep the police out
Photo credit: Bettmann/Corbis. A watchful eye guards the entrance to a speakeasy, circa 1930
 

from Careless People: Murder, Mayhem, and the Invention of The Great Gatsby by Sarah Churchwell-

Contrary to popular belief, speakeasies relied on business cards instead of passwords to keep the police out

Photo credit: Bettmann/Corbis. A watchful eye guards the entrance to a speakeasy, circa 1930

 

NY Mag Approval Matrix, Week of March 24th-
We love this ”deliberately oversimplified guide to who falls where on our taste hierarchies!” So happy to see Five Came Back by Mark Harris landed on the brilliant side! 

NY Mag Approval Matrix, Week of March 24th-

We love this ”deliberately oversimplified guide to who falls where on our taste hierarchies!” So happy to see Five Came Back by Mark Harris landed on the brilliant side!