bookstacks:


“I remember so clearly, in the early days, if I had to do a piece of press, they’d phone for me and say, ‘Oh, we’re going to bring hair and makeup, it’ll take about five hours.’ And I said, ‘Well, if it was Ian McEwan, would it take about five hours? Would there be hair and makeup? Cause if that’s not the case, then don’t bring the hair and makeup.’ So, it’s fascinating that they just assume: it’s a young woman, she must want to be photographed for five hours. She must have nothing better to do than delight in trying on all your shoes. But it’s not the case.” — Zadie Smith [x]Photographed by Eamonn McCabe

Zadie Smith is one of the best literary writers out today. When I look at photos of her, I think of the early Photos of Joyce Carol Oates (I once weeded fiction from a very large Central Library). Two great writers with a lot left to write about. 

bookstacks:

“I remember so clearly, in the early days, if I had to do a piece of press, they’d phone for me and say, ‘Oh, we’re going to bring hair and makeup, it’ll take about five hours.’ And I said, ‘Well, if it was Ian McEwan, would it take about five hours? Would there be hair and makeup? Cause if that’s not the case, then don’t bring the hair and makeup.’ So, it’s fascinating that they just assume: it’s a young woman, she must want to be photographed for five hours. She must have nothing better to do than delight in trying on all your shoes. But it’s not the case.”

— Zadie Smith [x]
Photographed by Eamonn McCabe

Zadie Smith is one of the best literary writers out today. When I look at photos of her, I think of the early Photos of Joyce Carol Oates (I once weeded fiction from a very large Central Library). Two great writers with a lot left to write about. 

Tags: Zadie Smith

Celebrate Earth Day with a good book! 
Four Fish by Paul Greenberg: all you need to know about sustainable fishing
A Climate of Crisis by Patrick Allitt: a provocative history of the environmental movement
Wild Ones by Jon Mooallem: a lively cultural history of animals in America
Windfall by McKenzie Funk: how people around the world are cashing in on global warming

Celebrate Earth Day with a good book! 

Four Fish by Paul Greenberg: all you need to know about sustainable fishing

A Climate of Crisis by Patrick Allitt: a provocative history of the environmental movement

Wild Ones by Jon Mooallem: a lively cultural history of animals in America

Windfall by McKenzie Funk: how people around the world are cashing in on global warming

“Which Cities Sleep in, and Which Get to Work Early” via FiveThirtyEight by Nate Silver

The metro area with the earliest workday is Hinesville, Ga. The median worker there arrives at work at 7:01 a.m. There’s a good chance they are in the military; the Hinesville area includes Fort Stewart and the Army’s 3rd Infantry Division. Military metros account for a number of the earliest-to-work communities, including Killeen, Texas (Fort Hood), and Jacksonville, N.C. (Camp Lejeune). 

New Yorkers get to work late — at least on a relative basis. The median worker in the New York metropolitan area begins their workday at 8:24 a.m.

Cities such as Atlantic City, N.J., Orlando, Fla., and Miami, whose economies are associated with recreation, tourism and gambling begin the workday later. A quarter of the workforce in Atlantic City doesn’t begin its workday until 11:26 a.m. or after.

Read the rest of the article here 

 Happy Earth Day! 
Photo Credit: National Geographic (taken in Canada’s Yukon Territory)

 Happy Earth Day! 

Photo Credit: National Geographic (taken in Canada’s Yukon Territory)

theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”
Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”

Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

(via frontofbook)

Tags: Zadie Smith

We love jewel tones, floral prints, and springtime!  Jo Becker visited our publicity team today to get a sneak peek of Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality on the cover of the New York Times Book Review. 

We love jewel tones, floral prints, and springtime!  Jo Becker visited our publicity team today to get a sneak peek of Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality on the cover of the New York Times Book Review. 

gayrights:

The conservative lawyer who defended California’s ban on gay marriage at the Supreme Court is at work on another project: planning his daughter’s upcoming same-sex wedding ceremony.

Charles J. Cooper, a former top official in the Reagan Justice Department and onetime “Republican lawyer of the year,” learned of his daughter’s sexual orientation during the legal battle over California’s Proposition 8, according to journalist Jo Becker’s soon-to-be-released book chronicling the movement to legalize same-sex marriage.

Read more

3 of our lovely writers were include in TIME’s list of 21 Female Authors You Should Be Reading

3 of our lovely writers were include in TIME’s list of 21 Female Authors You Should Be Reading

Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Modern Family) will be joining Jo Becker, author of Forcing the Spring, to discuss the fight for marriage equality!
Event details are here

Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Modern Family) will be joining Jo Becker, author of Forcing the Spring, to discuss the fight for marriage equality!

Event details are here

Enter the goodreads giveaway of How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg here!
How early should you get to the airport? What does “public opinion” really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer? 
Ellenberg has the answers!

Enter the goodreads giveaway of How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg here!

How early should you get to the airport? What does “public opinion” really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer? 

Ellenberg has the answers!